Too Much Stress in College: Best Ways To Cope With It

Most students look forward to joining college because it comes with new experiences, social settings, and freedom to explore life as a young adult. As much as college life is exciting, it has its fair share of stressful situations. No doubt, the workload is higher than when you were in high school. Loads of assignments, assessments, research papers, group forums, and much more can take a toll, especially on first-year students. You may have taken a challenging course that requires long study hours to ace the units. With so much to accomplish, juggling between maintaining a social life and academics can be overwhelming. 

If you do not maintain a healthy balance, you might find yourself dealing with stress without any coping mechanism. The independent education structure in college allows students to practice self-discipline and to plan their study hours conveniently. Thus, most students end up spending too much time on books without engaging in other extra-curricular activities, which can lead to academic stress.

Today, numerous custom writing services are available online ready to help out stressed students with academic writing tasks. Feel free to order essay writing and delegate your assignments and research papers to professionals and get time to engage in other school events. 

You can also battle with social stress during your first months in college since you are in a new environment where you have to form new social circles. Getting a roommate, balancing relationships, and new friendships with academics on the side can be quite tricky. So, what do you do to cope with stress in college? Read on to find out more about the best ways to reduce stress as a student in college:

Plan Your Schedule 

With new-found freedom, it is tricky for most students to organize their study schedules. You need to practice self-discipline and ensure that you attend all the lectures and complete your assignments on time. You might be tempted to attend a weekend party while your term paper is due on Monday morning, causing late paper submissions. 

It is vital to be an organized student by prioritizing your to-do-list. Create a convenient space in your room where you can concentrate during your study hours. If you have a messy and noisy roommate, you can become a frequent visitor in your quiet college library. 

Also, create a timetable and follow it strictly so that you can train yourself to have a regular study schedule and personal time to carry out errands and participate in various social events. It helps you to maintain a balance and avoid stressful situations where you have to work all night to complete assignments. 

Exercise

Regular exercise is a coping mechanism for stress. It reduces feelings of frustration as well as prevents weight gain. A ten-minute work-out can do wonders for your well-being, especially in the morning before starting your day. It releases tension and puts your mind and body in a healthy balance. 

Even if you are not an early riser, you can incorporate simple exercises in your daily routines, such as walking around campus, to the mall, or a friend’s house. You can also take physical education or gym classes during your free time. Enroll in yoga, salsa dances, martial arts, or gymnastics. Find an option that suits your preference and have fun while keeping academic stress at bay. 

Healthy Living 

Most college students feed on junk and sodas since they find it cumbersome to prepare a healthy meal. Taking care of your mind, body, and soul is essential in living a healthy life. While fast foods are readily available and affordable, it may seem convenient to grab on the go, but it will take a toll on your health in the long run. Eat a balanced meal to get the energy to face the day with confidence. Stock up fresh-fruits and vegetables in your room and learn to cook simple and healthy meals.

With hectic schedules, most students find it hard to get adequate sleep. Tight deadlines, anxiety due to exams, and pulling all-nighters can drain your energy. So, plan your schedule and sleep early to get enough sleep. It is vital for your physical and mental health. 

Wise Budgeting

You need to budget your money wisely to avoid financial stress. Do not engage in impulse buying, or you will end up broke within no time. Have a budget in place to guide you in your daily expenses. Try to make meal plans if you love eating out by cooking a few times a week. If you leave outside the campus, set aside your commuter allowance per month to prevent missing lectures. If you have an entertainment allowance, stick by it and don’t take money from your meal budget when it is depleted. Practice self-discipline, and you will enjoy a fulfilling financial future even after college.

Finding Support

Starting a new life in college is always stressful since you leave a secure support system at home – family members and friends. On the other hand, developing a new circle of friends and learning people takes time and effort. You might end up feeling home-sick and lonely during the first few days, weeks, or even months. So, ensure that you keep in close contact with people who matter in your life – parents, guardians, or close friends at home. Call your mother, send an email, or organize a video conference with your family. It might boost your attitude and motivate you to push ahead with school.

Also, you can find social support by joining clubs and discussion groups with like-minded students. Be social and start making friends in your class. Form study groups and engage yourself in different activities in college. You will avoid stress and loneliness since college life will start making sense in the long run.  

Ultimately, stress management is different for all students. What works for you may not work for another individual. Thus, it is imperative to find a suitable coping mechanism that will help you to reduce stress. Have a positive attitude, talk to someone, and engage in relaxing activities. Take care of your mental health since it is valuable and impacts your academic success.

Too Much Stress in College: Best Ways To Cope With It

Most students look forward to joining college because it comes with new experiences, social settings, and freedom to explore life as a young adult. As much as college life is exciting, it has its fair share of stressful situations. No doubt, the workload is higher than when you were in high school. Loads of assignments, assessments, research papers, group forums, and much more can take a toll, especially on first-year students. You may have taken a challenging course that requires long study hours to ace the units. With so much to accomplish, juggling between maintaining a social life and academics can be overwhelming. 

If you do not maintain a healthy balance, you might find yourself dealing with stress without any coping mechanism. The independent education structure in college allows students to practice self-discipline and to plan their study hours conveniently. Thus, most students end up spending too much time on books without engaging in other extra-curricular activities, which can lead to academic stress.

Today, numerous custom writing services are available online ready to help out stressed students with academic writing tasks. Feel free to order essay writing and delegate your assignments and research papers to professionals and get time to engage in other school events. 

You can also battle with social stress during your first months in college since you are in a new environment where you have to form new social circles. Getting a roommate, balancing relationships, and new friendships with academics on the side can be quite tricky. So, what do you do to cope with stress in college? Read on to find out more about the best ways to reduce stress as a student in college:

Plan Your Schedule 

With new-found freedom, it is tricky for most students to organize their study schedules. You need to practice self-discipline and ensure that you attend all the lectures and complete your assignments on time. You might be tempted to attend a weekend party while your term paper is due on Monday morning, causing late paper submissions. 

It is vital to be an organized student by prioritizing your to-do-list. Create a convenient space in your room where you can concentrate during your study hours. If you have a messy and noisy roommate, you can become a frequent visitor in your quiet college library. 

Also, create a timetable and follow it strictly so that you can train yourself to have a regular study schedule and personal time to carry out errands and participate in various social events. It helps you to maintain a balance and avoid stressful situations where you have to work all night to complete assignments. 

Exercise

Regular exercise is a coping mechanism for stress. It reduces feelings of frustration as well as prevents weight gain. A ten-minute work-out can do wonders for your well-being, especially in the morning before starting your day. It releases tension and puts your mind and body in a healthy balance. 

Even if you are not an early riser, you can incorporate simple exercises in your daily routines, such as walking around campus, to the mall, or a friend’s house. You can also take physical education or gym classes during your free time. Enroll in yoga, salsa dances, martial arts, or gymnastics. Find an option that suits your preference and have fun while keeping academic stress at bay. 

Healthy Living 

Most college students feed on junk and sodas since they find it cumbersome to prepare a healthy meal. Taking care of your mind, body, and soul is essential in living a healthy life. While fast foods are readily available and affordable, it may seem convenient to grab on the go, but it will take a toll on your health in the long run. Eat a balanced meal to get the energy to face the day with confidence. Stock up fresh-fruits and vegetables in your room and learn to cook simple and healthy meals.

With hectic schedules, most students find it hard to get adequate sleep. Tight deadlines, anxiety due to exams, and pulling all-nighters can drain your energy. So, plan your schedule and sleep early to get enough sleep. It is vital for your physical and mental health. 

Wise Budgeting

You need to budget your money wisely to avoid financial stress. Do not engage in impulse buying, or you will end up broke within no time. Have a budget in place to guide you in your daily expenses. Try to make meal plans if you love eating out by cooking a few times a week. If you leave outside the campus, set aside your commuter allowance per month to prevent missing lectures. If you have an entertainment allowance, stick by it and don’t take money from your meal budget when it is depleted. Practice self-discipline, and you will enjoy a fulfilling financial future even after college.

Finding Support

Starting a new life in college is always stressful since you leave a secure support system at home – family members and friends. On the other hand, developing a new circle of friends and learning people takes time and effort. You might end up feeling home-sick and lonely during the first few days, weeks, or even months. So, ensure that you keep in close contact with people who matter in your life – parents, guardians, or close friends at home. Call your mother, send an email, or organize a video conference with your family. It might boost your attitude and motivate you to push ahead with school.

Also, you can find social support by joining clubs and discussion groups with like-minded students. Be social and start making friends in your class. Form study groups and engage yourself in different activities in college. You will avoid stress and loneliness since college life will start making sense in the long run.  

Ultimately, stress management is different for all students. What works for you may not work for another individual. Thus, it is imperative to find a suitable coping mechanism that will help you to reduce stress. Have a positive attitude, talk to someone, and engage in relaxing activities. Take care of your mental health since it is valuable and impacts your academic success.

How Can You Keep Your Kids Safe At School?

As parents, sending our kids to school each and every day can be one of the most emotionally challenging things we do. We give up control of who we love the most, and sometimes there are serious dangers associated with the school environment.

These risks can start as soon as our kids get on the school bus. The school bus, particularly if your kid rides one that’s older and has fewer safety features, can be dangerous. 

Then throughout the day, there are a number of other possible risks, from dealing with bullies at school to the precautions kids with food allergies need to adhere to.

While as parents school might make us feel nervous, we do have to realize that teachers and administrators are doing their best to make it a safe environment.

Even so, are there things we can also do as parents?

School Bus Safety

If your child rides the bus to and from school, this is a good place to start focusing as far as helping to improve their level of safety. 

Work with your child, particularly if your child is younger, about how to be safe at the bus stop. This includes ensuring that you’re always on time, so no one is rushing. Rushing to the school bus can increase the likelihood of accidents. 

Your child should always stand at least three “giant” steps from the curb while they wait for the bus, and younger kids should have supervision until the bus arrives and they’re safely on.

Children should not ever walk behind the bus, and your child should learn that if they drop something, they should tell the bus driver before they try to pick it up. 

Other school bus safety tips that are important for kids to learn are:

  • Kids should always wait until the bus stops, and the doors open all the way before they approach to get on or stand up to get off. 
  • Teach your kids to use the handrail as they’re getting on and off the bus.
  • Don’t let your child have any hanging objects such as drawstrings when they’re getting on or off the bus. 

Learn the Procedures at Your Child’s School

Every school will have its own safety and emergency procedures and guidelines.

As a parent, learn what these are and regularly check in to make sure there are no changes or updates you need to be aware of. 

When you’re familiar with this information, you can then go over it with your child and make sure he or she will feel confident if certain situations arise. 

Your goal in helping your kids learn how to take proper safety measures should be encouraging them to be active, and take an active role in their safety instead of one that’s passive. 

Teach Your Kids When to Speak Up

Even the best teachers and school officials don’t see everything that might be happening. As a parent, your role in keeping your kids safe involves teaching them how to speak up when they see something that’s not right. 

Speaking up doesn’t mean tattling, and there are ways you can work with your child to differentiate these situations.  

Talk with your child about behaviors that aren’t safe or are unacceptable, and how to approach someone in charge when they see these things happening. 

If your child tells you something that seems especially harmful or dangerous, go directly to school officials. 

Be a Safety Advocate

Being involved is critical to make sure your child has a good school experience. 

As a parent, there are ways you can advocate to make the school environment safer for everyone. 

While many schools may have plans in place for certain situations, these may be in need of an update, or they may need improvements, and you can play a role in whether or not that happens. 

Ask school officials whether all staff have been trained in crisis response, and whether or not the emergency or crisis plans are reviewed and updated every year.

Talk to school officials about how they decide what’s developmentally appropriate for kids as far as crisis training. Has the school done a full risk assessment to determine and address what their vulnerabilities might be?

How does the school identify and deal with potential threats, including threats of violence from students, parents, or other people directly associated with the school?

Encourage Open Communication with Your Child

The more openly and honestly your child communicates with you, the more you will know about what’s going on at school. You’ll also be able to identify any red flags before they become larger problems.

A few tips for good communication with your kids include:

  • Don’t make your child feel judged for sharing their feelings. In younger kids, you can help them learn the right words to express what they’re feeling. 
  • Work with your child on problem-solving skills. 
  • Be honest when you communicate with your child if you hope for your child to do the same. 
  • Simply be available and willing to listen, whenever it’s needed. You can’t always schedule a time or structure time for a conversation. Your child will talk when they want to and are ready. 
  • Show your child you’re actively listening to what they’re saying.
  • Learn how to read body language and facial expressions. 

Keep Your Child’s Records Up to Date

Your child might have an allergy or health problem, and the only way for the people at the school to know that is if you communicate with them. Regularly check-in to make sure your child’s records are accurate and complete. 

Speak to teachers, the school nurse, and anyone else who’s relevant about what your child’s needs are and how you handle their mental or physical health conditions. 

It’s scary to let go of control as a parent, but there are things you can do to facilitate a safe school experience for your child through your active involvement. 

Career Choices if You Love the Outdoors

Do you hate the idea of being cooped up in an office all day? Do you instead long to spend most of your time in nature? This might feel incompatible with settling down and getting a “real” job, but having a career doesn’t always mean you have to spend all your time in meetings and sitting in front of computers fiddling with spreadsheets. There are plenty of exciting jobs that maximize your time in the outdoors. In most cases, you’ll need a bachelor’s degree at minimum.

Think About Funding

Education can be expensive, so you need to start thinking about how you will pay for it. If it’s a graduate degree you are after, you should focus on programs that offer fellowships, assistantships or other opportunities for funding. If you’re entering an undergraduate program, you may have to take out student loans unless you have substantial savings. Even if you qualify for federal student loans based on need, these might not be enough. You can also apply for private student loans. Over the last decade, a number of private lenders online have made the process easier.

Strengthen Your Science Skills

Most of the career path jobs that you do outdoors are in the field of science. If you’re a high school student, you’ll want to get a good grounding in biology, chemistry and your other science courses. If you’re an adult who is considering a career change, you might want to look into taking some college courses to brush up. If your degree is another field, such as the humanities, you may have to take a number of courses to get the foundation you need.

Research

If you’re entering college as a freshman, you don’t have to decide immediately what you want to study, but it will be helpful if you go in with some idea. If you’re an adult making a career change, you need more certainty. Among the opportunities are biologist or wildlife specialist, botanist, park ranger or conservation scientist. If you’re more interested in growing things than studying things that grow, you might be interested in farming. While this can seem like an old-fashioned job, there are opportunities in smaller-scale sustainable and organic farming, providing high-end produce to farmer’s markets and restaurants. There are also jobs that may not be specifically focused on the natural world but which include a substantial amount fieldwork in the outdoors. For example, as an archeologist, you’ll spend a lot of your time digging outside.

Get in Shape

If you already love the outdoors, it’s likely you are already in decent shape, but if you aren’t, make this the incentive you need. You don’t need to be able to run marathons to work outdoors, but you’ll be much more comfortable in your outdoor job if you maintain a minimal level of fitness. Depending on the field you work in and your specialty, you might need to be prepared to do some hiking. Other jobs, such as farming and archeology, may require bending and squatting along with some upper body strength.

Essay Examples for University: How to Work With a Large Base of Academic Papers

For many young people, working with text is the most difficult of all the tasks. This is possible even if a person perfectly expresses thoughts in dialogues, reads a lot. And good English vocabulary base does not help. When you University entrance depends on the personal statement in the essay or it significantly influences the rating, the necessary words are not found. Stupor! What should you write?

 Yes. This is hard. But everything is possible if you read at least 10 examples of successful essay examples for university and analyze their advantages. In some of them, the theme was very well chosen. Somewhere it turned out very spectacular ending with the personal conclusions of the author.

Some writers were able to interest the audience in the introductory part. Someone managed to answer the question of millions in his compare or contrast research and gave clear instructions for the right choice. There are many secrets of a good essay, and in fact, there is no single right recipe for a super-text.

A guide to the proper use of samples database

In order to find your strengths in text writing, study the largest database of academic paper examples and re-read each essay example on EssayTopic.net that is close to you on the topic.

1. Make a large list of those texts that you want to read, at least 30 essays.

2. In the second stage of working with essay samples, drop out more than half. Leave topics,  which you find good.

3. Read each sample at least twice.

4. Make a list of the moments in texts that you find strong. This will help to create your own bright ideas.

5. Highlight the three best examples as references.

Next, let’s understand how to create your essay, based on good examples that you have already found. First, you need to realize that the main thing is to start the text. Fix all your thoughts on paper. Some tips for writing:

1.    You have already read essay examples for university. Just analyze what their advantageous sides are. You need to understand: everyone who sets goals works effectively. In the case of writing a text, the goal is to make a good text that you yourself would add to the list of successful examples.

2.    Decide on the concept: argumentative, descriptive, narrative or any other format.

3.    Make a short plan of the text:  what exactly do you want to express. Just record all thoughts on all these points. You do not need to immediately make a sentence that successfully conveys the idea. It is better to go further than to get stuck at the beginning with a sense of unfinished thoughts. If the right words have not yet appeared in your head on any of the items, move on by the list. Perhaps you just need time or more processed information on the topic.

4.    Follow the structure of the essay: Introduction – Body – Conclusion. The text should be started, developed to the required level of information and completed. Do not interrupt it.

5.     Show the more mature state of mind, some kind of enlightenment on this topic, insight, a new understanding, a level of maturity. Such texts are always fun to read.

6.    Do not copy the example! Express your personal opinion, even if it is different from the stereotype that has developed in society. After all, you already have a certain life experience for many essay topics.

When a university teacher picks up a new  paper, what happens next? This work may just be a simple text, like all the rest. What is your weapon? An unusual start. A fascinating first sentence. Surprise, make fun, interest, intrigue, disturb if appropriate. And then your work will definitely be read in one breath. After all, the reader will expect something incredible when he sees such a beginning. And do not skimp on the findings.

The university admissions office does not want to read your life story. They want to feel your character, skills, your goals and your views on life. It represents the value.